Tag Archives: portrait

Dude

A moment presented itself in my hectic schedule in which to sketch.  I knew it was coming, too, so I packed my stuff up and toted our oldest son along to the auto shop.  Nothing major, just having some fluids changed, so I knew I’d have an hour or so to kill.  I only spent a few minutes sketching, however, because some dude walked in and turned the dang TV on in the waiting room.  Well, it wasn’t because he turned it on.  It was because of what he decided to watch… Tombstone!  That is my all-time favorite movie!  I can quote the dialogue along side the actors, almost verbatim.  It’s sad, I know.  Needless to say I watched more than I sketched.  Because my dad and I both loved this movie, and knew everything there is to know about the cast of characters, my dad made me promise to name my first son Wyatt.  Dad passed away before I could have a son, but I honored the promise.  Wyatt James Ayers.

At the end of the visit, this is what I had – after a dude out of a Time magazine laying on the coffee table.

Some dude.  Pentel pocket brush pen in the sketchbook. Notice Kurt Russel as Wyatt Earp from Tombstone in the background.

Some dude. Pentel pocket brush pen in the sketchbook. Notice Kurt Russel as Wyatt Earp from Tombstone in the background.

When I got home I spent five minutes (literally) to throw on some watercolor.

Dude... now with color.

Dude… now with color.

I hope I can have some more moments to doodle again sometime.  I do love it so.

Mr. Mayor

I got an email from the folks at sketchbookproject.com about a new project for the week: Challenge Accepted! – This week we ask you to share a little piece of home and draw a portrait of your town’s mayor.”

I didn’t even know who our Mayor was.  Isn’t that sad?  Well, I didn’t want to do a drawing of some boring looking politician, so I scoured his (turns out his name is Billy Copeland) Facebook page and found a photo of him in these wonderful shades.  The likeness isn’t all that great, but it was fun.  Thanks, and it was nice getting to “know” you, Mr. Mayor!

Billy Copeland, Mayor of McDonough, Georgia. Watercolor on 4"x6", 140 lb cold-pressed watercolor paper.

Billy Copeland, Mayor of McDonough, Georgia. Watercolor on 4″x6″, 140 lb cold-pressed watercolor paper.

Funny Face

I wanted an interesting face to draw/paint, so I Googled “funny face”, and I was drawn to a certain black and white photo of a man contorting his face just so.  I thought, “That’ll do”, broke out a piece of ACEO and a brush pen, and went at it.  Of course black and white won’t do, so I added a touch of color.  Here he is:

Brush pen and watercolor on ACEO

Brush pen and watercolor on ACEO

Dad

I haven’t seen or talked with my dad since sometime in the mid 90’s.  We had a falling out.  He passed away in 2003 at the age of 59, alone – well alone in the sense that he had no family around.  He was in his childhood hometown, Placerville, California, and his brother lived in Pollock Pines, and his father in Sacramento.  I assume he had friends at the assisted living home he was in at the time, but he greatly valued family, and none were present when he died.  I still feel great remorse at the fact that I couldn’t be a better man for not talking to him for years.  It goes back a few years, though – our history.

He left mom for another woman in 1976.  I was 7 years old, my brother was 4, pushing 5.  Our world collapsed on us, and we ended up moving from San Jose, CA clear across the continent to Jacksonville, FL, where mom was from.  We flew out to San Jose the next Summer (’77) and visited for a couple months.  The next time I would see him would be after I graduated boot camp 10 years later.  My brother had to wait until my first marriage in 1991 before he saw dad again.

Reconnecting was awkward after so many years.  We barely remembered him.  I can’t imagine how that must’ve been for him, our father.  He had an anyeurism burst in his brain, and nearly died shortly after he left mom.  He changed after that.  He was cantancerous and bull-headed.  One day, I took it the wrong way, and that was the last time I spoke to him.  I’m sorry, dad.  Turns out I was bull-headed, too.

He and his second wife adopted a little boy, who I am now fairly close with, although he lives in CA and I in GA now.  We both made it to his funeral in ’03, where he met my younger brother for the first time.  They both got along amazingly… so much alike, they were.

My blood brother ended up killing himself in 2006, almost a year after being my best man in my wedding to the absolute best woman I ever knew.  I miss him terribly.  He was my best friend.

Grandpa outlived them both, passing away in 2012 at the age of 93.  I got to see my adopted brother again then, and we enjoyed our time together in Sacramento for the funeral.

A couple weeks ago, he texted me a photo of our dad.  It looks to be about the late ’80s; about the time he and I first re-connected.  Today during lunch I used that photo to practice with my brushpens, and it turned into this.  Not too serious an attempt, but better than sketching (as that’s how it all started).

Brushpens, watercolor, and charcoal on pressboard backing.

Brushpens, watercolor, and charcoal on pressboard backing.

Murray

Here’s another mini-portrait on the back of a business card (my niche).  It was modeled after a photo of Bill Murray from the web (photo credit to Ben Margo – AP).  The business card, being so narrow, makes me tend to elongate heads.  So, it ends up not looking a heckuva lot like Bill Murray (sorry, dude).  Here are the process shots…

Began with a light sketch

Began with a light sketch

Inked in with Pentel brushpens

Inked in with Pentel brushpens

Finished off with watercolor

Finished off with watercolor

Sleeper

My daughter fell asleep at the dinner table one night, and I got a picture of it.  Since I’m enjoying doing these miniature portraits on the back of business cards, I thought it would be a fun photo to try.  Not such a boring photo… you know, mix it up a bit.  OK, so here’s Jordan:

She fell asleep: Brushpen & watercolor on the back of an old business card.

She fell asleep: Brushpen & watercolor on the back of an old business card.

Tommy

Another miniature portrait on the back of a business card.  This time, during lunch at work.  Good thing I can shut my door.  It’s my Uncle Tommy.

"Tommy", watercolor and Kuretake #8 brush pen on the back of a business card

“Tommy”, watercolor and Kuretake #8 brush pen on the back of a business card